Click the book cover above to access the very artistic collection of Haiku Inspired By Nature by UNDP GEF

Click the book cover above to access the very artistic collection of Haiku Inspired By Nature by UNDP GEF

Wildopeneye is celebrating 2017’s International Biodiversity Day (May 22) by sharing the link to a very fine collection of Haiku poetry published by UNDP to celebrate global biodiversity, “Inspired By Nature”.

A haiku is a form of Japanese poem with a rhythm of five syllables in the first line, followed by seven in the second and then five again in the final line. They are by tradition, succinct and pithy. Most are powerfully evocative, they can also be very beautiful indeed. Many have an element of mystery about them and like Dr. Who’s TARDIS they defy known physical laws by containing more meaning than you’d think possible in such few words.  These haiku are fine examples of the tradition, sourced from conservationists around the world and derive force that well-spring of personal motivation and from direct observation. The accompanying fine illustrations and photographs make this an altogether inspiring collection. It is hard to pick a favourite, I think they are all great, but different haiku will apeal more to particular people, as they strike chords with them. I think this is not just a work of art, but herein lie very powerfully persuasive messages, ideally suited to bill board ads and slideshow presentations, PSA’s etc.

I quote two that appeal to me very powerfully:

Tim Scott’s haiku about sharks and predation:

“Fins slicing water

Fins sliced out of water

                                                            Who is the real killer?

                                                                                                  – Tim Scott”

Also Saskia Marijnissen’s haiku about the tortoise:

“Old is the tortoise

He has seen the world change fast

While people act slow”

– Saskia Marijnissen

I love this project, it really is a tour de force and I think Andy Luck would have loved it too. Who knows it may inspire you to write a haiku or two of your own?

It inspired me to write one:

 

“Slivers of silver,

flashing bright through Gourd bayou,

nature is fecund.”

Shoal of fish fry swimming at the suface in Russel Sage WMA's Gourd Bayou, Monroe, Louisiana. C. Paxton image and copyright.

Shoal of fish fry swimming at the suface in Russel Sage WMA’s Gourd Bayou, Monroe, Louisiana. C. Paxton image and copyright.