Tiger Swallowtail male beside Lake D'Arbonne, Louisiana. Biodiversity preservation will include vast numbers of butterflies and moths. CPaxton image and copyright.

Tiger Swallowtail male beside Lake D’Arbonne, Louisiana. Biodiversity preservation will include vast numbers of butterflies and moths. C. Paxton image and copyright.


 New national commitments under the Convention on Biological Diversity have been adopted by 101 countries out of the 196 parties to the Convention, but many fall short of  targets set at Aichi, some lack targets and commitments altogether for important elements according to UNEP Press Release, 22 July 2016

· 101 countries have submitted new national biodiversity strategies and action plans (NBSAPS),
under the Convention on Biological Diversity, aimed at implementing the Strategic Plan for
Biodiversity 2011-2020
· These include NBSAPs that set targets surpassing the level of ambition set out in the Strategic
Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020
· However, additional action is still needed by Parties to the Convention in order to achieve the
Aichi Biodiversity Targets by 2020

 One hundred and one Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) have now
submitted new national biodiversity strategies and action plans (NBSAPs), setting out their national
contributions to the achievement of the Aichi Biodiversity Targets, a set of 20 global targets to be
achieved by 2020.
The Aichi Biodiversity Targets are part of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020, an overarching
framework to protect biodiversity and enhance its benefits for people, approved by governments in 2010
and since recognised by the United Nations as setting the global framework for action on biodiversity.
“Reaching this milestone is an important achievement, but we still have a lot of work ahead of us,” said
Braulio Ferreira de Souza Dias, CBD Executive Secretary. “In the lead up to the thirteenth meeting of the
Conference of the Parties (COP 13), being held this December in Cancun, Mexico, I encourage all
countries that have yet to develop, revise or update their NBSAPs, to do so as soon as possible.”
In adopting the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020, the Conference of the Parties to the Convention
on Biological Diversity invited Parties to establish their own national targets, using the Strategic Plan as
flexible framework, taking into account national needs and priorities, while also bearing in mind national
contributions to the achievement of the global Aichi Biodiversity Targets.
The majority of NBSAPs include targets that reflect specific Aichi Biodiversity Targets, and many relate
to targets on public awareness, pollution reduction, invasive alien species, protected areas, preventing
extinction, access to and sharing benefits from genetic resources and sharing information and knowledge.
Several Parties have set targets surpassing the level of ambition set out in the Strategic Plan. For example:

  • Dominica: Aichi Biodiversity Target 11 – “By 2020, at least 20% of terrestrial, inland water and
    15% of coastal and marine areas, especially areas of particular importance for biodiversity and
    ecosystem service, are conserved through comprehensive ecologically representative and wellconnected
    systems of effectively managed, protected areas and other means, and integrated into
    the wider land and seascape.”
  • Finland: Aichi Biodiversity Target 5 – “By 2020, the loss of all natural habitats has been halted,
    and the degradation and fragmentation of natural habitats have been significantly reduced.”
  • The Gambia: Aichi Biodiversity Target 15 – “By 2020, ecosystem resilience and the contribution
    of biodiversity to carbon stocks has been enhanced, through conservation and restoration,
    including restoration of at least 50 per cent of degraded ecosystems.”


However, most of the national targets and/or commitments contained in the NBSAPs set lower levels of
ambition than the Aichi Biodiversity Targets, or did not address all elements of the Target. For some Aichi
Biodiversity Targets, such as those related to incentives, or the sustainable management of aquatic living
resources, or reducing the pressures on ecosystems vulnerable to climate change and ecosystem services,
many NBSAPs lacked associated national targets or commitments.


Analysis of national reports submitted by countries indicates that the majority of Parties have made
progress towards the Aichi Biodiversity Targets but at an insufficient rate to allow the targets to be met by
the deadline unless additional actions are taken. The information in the national reports suggests that, for
some Aichi Biodiversity Targets, about a third of Parties are on track to reach or exceed the level of
ambition agreed globally. However, the progress is much lower for other targets. Overall, while progress is
being made, it is at an insufficient rate, and additional efforts are required to achieve the ambition that
Parties collectively agreed in the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020.


Issues related to the implementation of the Convention, and the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020
and its Aichi Biodiversity Targets will be the subject of discussion at the upcoming thirteenth meeting of
the CBD Conference of the Parties, to be held in Cancun, Mexico, from 4 – 17 December, 2016.
More Information
This press release is based on the “Updated analysis of the contribution of targets established by Parties
and progress towards the Aichi Biodiversity Targets,” document UNEP/CBD/COP/13/8/add.1 available
at: www.cbd.int/doc/?meeting=COP-13
Aichi Biodiversity Targets: www.cbd.int/sp/targets/
National Biodiversity Strategies and Action Plans: www.cbd.int/nbsap/
National Reports: www.cbd.int/reports/
First meeting of the Subsidiary Body on Implementation (SBI 1) documents:
www.cbd.int/doc/?meeting=sbi-01

The Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD)
Opened for signature at the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro in 1992, and entering into force in
December 1993, the Convention on Biological Diversity is an international treaty for the conservation of
biodiversity, the sustainable use of the components of biodiversity and the equitable sharing of the
benefits derived from the use of genetic resources. With 196 Parties so far, the Convention has near
universal participation among countries. The Convention seeks to address all threats to biodiversity and
ecosystem services, including threats from climate change, through scientific assessments, the
development of tools, incentives and processes, the transfer of technologies and good practices and the full
and active involvement of relevant stakeholders including indigenous and local communities, youth,
NGOs, women and the business community. The Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety and the Nagoya
Protocol on Access and Benefit Sharing are supplementary agreements to the Convention. The Cartagena
Protocol, which entered into force on 11 September 2003, seeks to protect biological diversity from the
potential risks posed by living modified organisms resulting from modern biotechnology. To date, 170
Parties have ratified the Cartagena Protocol. The Nagoya Protocol aims at sharing the benefits arising
from the utilization of genetic resources in a fair and equitable way, including by appropriate access to
genetic resources and by appropriate transfer of relevant technologies. It entered into force on 12 October
2014 and to date has been ratified by 78 Parties.

For more information visit: www.cbd.int.

For additional information, please contact: David Ainsworth on +1 514 287 7025 or at david.ainsworth@cbd.int; or
Johan Hedlund on +1 514 287 6670 or at johan.hedlund@cbd.int.