Hugh Paxton inspecting the rescued Tokay for signs of damage. Chang Htoo 2015

Hugh Paxton inspecting the rescued Tokay for signs of damage. Chang Htoo 2015

Hugh Paxton pictured above came upon a 1.2 m long tree-snake attempting to ingest this handsome Tokay gecko. This large nocturnal lizard lives throughout Southeast Asia and gets its name from its call, an abrupt, slightly abrasive and surprisingly loud “Tokay” sound.

The Golden Flying Snake had a taste for Tokay! Chang Htoo photo and copyright.

The Golden Flying Snake had a taste for Tokay! Chang Htoo photo and copyright.

“I assumed it was dead and the snake dropped it as it retreated up the holy Banyan tree.” Hugh said. He then put it in a box to quietly recover or die. It has now recovered and presumably licked its eyes to help recover its equilibrium.

Hugh advised Chang to put the shed snakeskin into his wallet to bring him luck, as the Chinese do. Snakes regularly shed their skins when they grow larger. Chang Htoo photo and copyright.

Hugh advised Chang to put the shed snakeskin into his wallet to bring him luck, as the Chinese do. Snakes regularly shed their skins when they grow larger. Chang Htoo photo and copyright.

The attractive tree snake is superbly adapted to life in the tropical forest of Thailand. It can climb straight up tree trunks or other rough vertical surfaces and it has another trick up its snakish sleeve. IT CAN LAUNCH ITSELF FROM A TREE AND GLIDE TO ANOTHER TREE. Hence its common name The Flying Snake. It presents no danger to humans, but occasionally gets fried on electric power lines.

Both this snake and the gecko are alive and well and living in downtown Bangkok, Thailand. A Nature City. Thank you for the interesting photo-story Chang.