Wildopeneye has begun a new series of condensed case profiles of environmental conservation efforts and some issues pertinent to them that we feel are worthy of attention. We have called this series ‘Eye on‘. These conservation profiles are intended to be interesting introductions to the issues, habitats, creatures, people and places involved.  Eye On pages are accessible from the wildopeneye.com main menu and are linked to the conservation organizations involved.

The idea is to highlight some very valuable conservation efforts and to faithfully contextualize them and bring them to life for readers as succinctly as we can. There are a lot of interesting and worthwhile conservation projects ongoing around the world. WildOpenEye hopes to present some of these in an interesting, relatively digestible fashion and to provide all necessary links and details to enable readers to follow up their interest in the named projects independently, to get updates from the sources and perhaps to become more involved if they so wish, either as remote sponsors or supporter members or as project volunteers.

Conservation volunteers force feeding a sick Olive Ridley in an attempt to save its life

Conservation volunteers force feeding a sick Olive Ridley in an attempt to save its life

The first in our series takes us to the surf-pounded fringing black sand beaches of Guatemala’s Pacific coast, more specifically to the conservation area known as Biotopo Hawaii where community wildlife conservation volunteers from ARCAS and AKAZUL are working to conserve endangered Pacific Olive Ridley and Leatherback sea turtles. The reserve protects 3500 hectares of mangrove forest, wetlands and lagoons on Guatemala’s tropical Pacific coast and hosts arribadas of nesting sea turtles. From their volunteer centre on the beach (see photo below), ARCAS operates the most productive of the 18-21 sea turtle hatcheries in Guatemala, collecting up to 40,000 Olive Ridley and Leatherback eggs per year for protected development, hatch and release. The recent mysterious deaths of breeding adult Olive Ridley sea turtles is a matter of great concern. For more information please Click Here

Aerial Photo Of The ARCAS Hatchery (source: ARCAS Annual Report 2010)